Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter covering civil rights at ProPublica in New York City.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter covering civil rights at ProPublica in New York City. 

Nikole's most recent investigation documents the resegregation of Southern schools through an intensive look at Tuscaloosa, Ala., one of the most rapidly resegregating districts in the country. It's not news to many that American schools have been resegregating, but this investigation pulls back the curtain on the backroom dealing, political compromises and intentional decision-making that has led to resegregation, while also laying out the devastating personal consequences of this segregation. The project published in the spring at ProPublica and in The Atlantic Magazine -- ahead of the 60th anniversary of the historic Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Nikole has also written extensively about the decades-long failure of the federal government to enforce the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act and analyses of the racial implications of the controversial Fisher v. University of Texas affirmative action and other civil right cases before the Supreme Court.

Her reporting has been featured in The New York Times, The Atlantic Magazine, Huffington Post, Essence Magazine, The Week Magazine, Grist, Politico Magazine and on Face the Nation, This American Life, NPR, the Tom Joyner Morning Show, MSNBC, C-SPAN, Democracy Now and radio stations across the country.

Nikole continues to investigate the policies and politics that maintain segregation.  She is always looking for stories and is particularly interested in talking with sources about school segregation and tracking.

Purchase Nikole's e-book, "Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law" as a Kindle single.

Purchase Nikole's e-book, "Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law" as a Kindle single.

Purchase Nikole's e-book, "Ghosts of Greenwood: Dispatches From Freedom Summer" as a Kindle single. 

Purchase Nikole's e-book, "Ghosts of Greenwood: Dispatches From Freedom Summer" as a Kindle single. 


The Lede


3.26.2015 "Segregation Now" wins first prize for beat reporting in the national Education Writers Association awards.


3.4.2015 Politico Magazine published Nikole's personal essay on policing in black America


2.27.2015 Grist published Nikole's piece, "Gentrification doesn’t fix inner-city schools."


1.15.2015 "Segregation Now" has been named a finalist in the Public Interest category of the National Magazine Awards


12.19.2014 The New York Times co-published Nikole's investigation of Michael Brown and school segregation in St. Louis.


9.27.14 "Segregation Now" took home two awards at the 2014 Online Journalism Awards, one for feature writing and one for explanatory reporting. 



8.25.14 The Online News Association names "Segregation Now" a finalist for five awards.


8.14.14 Nikole wrote a piece for Essence.com on how the media was covering the protests/riots in Ferguson, Mo. 


8.1.14 "The Week" magazine published an excerpt of "Ghosts of Greenwood" in its "The Last Word" section. 


7.14"Ghosts of Greenwood" hits No. 1 on Longreads.


7.11.14 Nikole wrote about visiting her ancestral land, Greenwood, Miss., for the first time in a deeply personal essay on the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer. 


Read "Segregation Now: The Resegregation of American Schools," co-published by ProPublica and The Atlantic Magazine.

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5.17.14 Nikole reflected on the 60th anniversary of Brown v Board in light of her reporting on MSNBC's "Melissa Harris-Perry Show."

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4.24.14 "Democracy Now" featured Nikole's reporting on "Segregation Now."


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4.18.14  Nikole discussed "Segregation Now" on MSNBC's "The Reid Report".




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4.13.14 Nikole appeared on "Face the Nation" to discuss her The Atlantic/ProPublica investigation into school resegregation and to discuss civil rights 50 years after the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Watch the segment here. 

"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." Ida B. Wells, muckracking journalist.